3 things to do before applying to a job

http://www.mediafire.com/convkey/861d/0n95eic12w8rzzkfg.jpg?size_id=bI recently spoke with a senior executive of one of the largest staffing firms in the world. She said something that blew me away – “Less than 5% of her firm’s thousands of placements per year came from people responding to job postings.” Most were people who followed the company and were already in its database of screened and qualified candidates.

In the last six months, I’ve met with hundreds of recruiters from small to mid-size external staffing firms. All of them said only 10-15% of their hires came from people who responded to a job posting. The rest were either already known by them or proactively sought out via referrals of qualified passive people.

In the past year, my firm has trained over 500 recruiters who work directly for corporations. They indicate that about 15-20% of their hires come from job postings and mostly for lower level or staff positions. The rest are already in their database of followers or employee referrals.

For job-hunters, this suggests that no more than 20% of your efforts should be put towards responding to job postings. Most of it should be focused on getting referred to these open jobs. With this idea in mind, here are three things you can do, starting right now, to find a new job.

Use the job posting as a lead, then reverse the “hub and spoke” sourcing process.

Unless you’re close to a perfect match on skills and experience and meet the academic requirements, don’t bother applying directly to the job. Instead, use the back door to get noticed. For example, on Indeed.com I noticed that Halliburton has a dozen mechanical engineering job openings in Houston, all related to project management efforts involving a variety of electro-mechanical engineering disciplines. There are very few people who meet the exact requirements for any individual job, but there are many people who have the generic skills to handle these positions. If I were advising Halliburton, I’d suggest they use a “hub and spoke” sourcing process to group all of these jobs on a microsite and then, as they find people, assign them to the specific jobs that are the most reasonable fits.

Candidates can reverse this hub and spoke process by going on LinkedIn and finding people who are leading these project management efforts. As part of this example, I found more than 20 people on LinkedIn who have senior project manager titles within the technical specialty of interest. If I were interested in these jobs I’d contact the people directly, but I wouldn’t send them my resume. I’d use a different approach to get referred. Some ideas follow.

Don’t send your resume, demonstrate your ability instead.

There is no rule stating you must send in a resume to get a job interview. Getting noticed first is the key. One way to get noticed is to solve a problem likely being faced by the company. There are often clues to this in the job posting and by doing a little company research. Over the past few years candidates have told me they have sent in samples of their work, prepared PowerPoint decks describing related work they’ve handled, created YouTube videos answering The Most Important Interview Question of All Time and conducted the type of analyses described in the job posting to demonstrate their subject matter expertise.

None of these were sent to HR or the recruiting team. All were sent to the hiring manager or someone who could refer the person to the hiring manager. For the Halliburton example, I’d send the material to all of the senior project managers and then follow up with a phone call. If you mention you’ve also sent the material to the senior VP the other directors will likely act upon it sooner.

Start networking by influencing people you know to introduce you to people you don’t know.

Networking is not about meeting as many people as you can in the hope that someone will know about a job opening. Networking is about meeting a few people who know you very well and can refer you to others they know very well. Here’s a complete post on the networking process and a short video.

Most job-seekers make excuses about why networking doesn’t work for them. Hogwash. It works for everyone.

It’s hard work though, and that’s why most people don’t want to do it. Regardless, find just a few people who know your abilities and ask them to introduce you to some of their most influential and well-connected contacts. As part of these discussions, have them review the project work described above and your resume or LinkedIn profile. Ask for suggestions and 2-3 more referrals. Then connect with these people and review the same materials and ask for 2-3 more referrals. This is how you build your network and how you’ll get your next job.

Getting referred is the best way to get a job. It’s also the best way to get connected to the recruiters handling the best jobs. More important, the bigger and deeper your network, the greater the likelihood that the jobs you’ll hear about will be better, too. Getting started is the hardest part of all this. These tips will help. However, once you get the job, don’t stop the networking process. This is how you’ll get your next job.

-Lou Adler

Stuck searching for the best career? A career journal may be the answer!

http://www.mediafire.com/convkey/53b4/ics2g7fx255bmi4fg.jpg?size_id=6Right after high school I did a short stint in a culinary arts school. It was a strange little place that ultimately wasn’t a good fit, but it planted the seed of an idea that I would come to revisit over 15 years later. In our first semester each student was given a rigid blue plastic box – about the size of a 3-ring binder – filled with blank pages like a scrapbook. It was designed to be a professional development portfolio where we could store our resume, certificates of achievement, and anything else that would highlight our accomplishments during a job interview. In theory, it was a great concept to encourage us to develop a career mindset. But ultimately its high dork factor relegated my blue box to the thrift store donation bin.

Now that I’m in the position of helping people navigate their career exploration, I’ve tweaked the concept of a dedicated space for career materials into a career exploration journal. Not an awkward blue box, but a more personalized notebook or binder where career seekers can store and explore all things career oriented. In my last blog I wrote about the errors of the American career search, and how self-inquiry is not emphasized early enough or strong enough in our youth. In this follow up, I propose that developing a comprehensive career journal is a valuable personal development tool for all ages in the career stream.

Below are some of the general framework components of a career journal. I see it as a living project that carries throughout a person’s career span. While one might add folders for resumes and certificates of achievement, the primary goal is to conduct introspective writing and brainstorming on career-related themes. I suggest dividing a section of the notebook/binder to each of the following headings:

 

Core Values (Write about what really matters and what guides you. How can the work you do day in and day out align with your values?)

Skills/Strengths (Go ahead, toot your own horn, what are you good at?)

Interests/Hobbies (All of them. That’s right, jot down everything you can think of that grabs your attention.)

Needs and Wants (From a job, from a career span, from life in general. What is essential, what would be luxury, and what isn’t so much a priority?)

The ROPES: Roadblocks, Obligations, Pressures, and Excuses (What are the things that seem to get in your way?)

Mission, Meaning, and Focus (What propels you forward and why do you do what you do? What would feel rewarding to contribute to the world?)

Keywords and Job Titles (When you come across a job related keyword or job title that piques your interest, record it here for when you sit down to conduct your job search. These come in handy when you’re writing your resume, cover letter, and inputting search terms into job boards.)

Testimonials and References (When people praise your abilities, ask if you can “quote them on that” or use them as a future reference. You will need these and you don’t want to be scrambling to find them at the last minute. After all, it’s Murphy’s Law that the deadline for the job posting you most love expires in the morning.)

Reality and Research (Know what you’re getting into. Dreams and fantasies are wonderful, but how do they fit into the real world? How will you support yourself as you move toward your long term goals? What’s your plan?)

Rainmakers and Resources (Make a comprehensive list of everyone you know in your extended network: your friends, teachers, mentors, ex co-workers… anybody to whom you might someday reach out for advice or job leads.)

Resume and Cover Letter (Know where they are when you need them. Tweak them and update them– your professional voice and writing skill develops over a lifetime.)

Continuing Education (What skills do you eventually want added to your toolkit? Keep a list of the who, what, when, where, and how you can grow as a professional. Many careers require continuing education and this will keep you organized and on top of those requirements.)

 

Give each of these sections a tab in the journal and come back to them whenever inspiration strikes. Make an effort to sit undistracted with your journal and brainstorm what truly matters to you. And what does not.

We don’t know where our professional life will ultimately lead, but we can develop a sense for what we want it to contain. This is the kind of attention few of us are encouraged to give to our career exploration, yet I believe it would greatly decrease the amount of job dissatisfaction. The encouragement to explore what each of us wants and needs from a fulfilled life seems revolutionary in its possibility. Could it be part of the antidote to an unstimulated and overstressed workforce?

Brad Waters – PsychologyToday

i want to be an ophthalmic technician- where do I start?

Q:

Hello Charisse, my name is Randy. I was thrown your name by Loriene, one of the linkedin group admins.  She wanted me to contact you in regards to exploring a career in Ophthalmology as a COT.

I am retiring from active duty, Army, and I want to get back into the Optical field, but want more than what I have done as an Optician. I love what I have read so far about COTs and the level of training required.

My concerns are that my age might work against me, and where is the best place to go to receive training that is still around Tennessee.

Any help or mentorship would be greatly appreciated.

A:

Hello randy! Nice to read your message. Thank you for your service, my brother is in the army too. welcome to the family!

We would love to assist! There are a couple great practices in your area as well as suggesting jcahpo.org to learn about an ophthalmic technician career! You will need to consider either school to become a cot right off the bat or you can “learn on the job” and work your way up like i did. Its a great field. as to age… no worries, this is an almost age-less industry. if we can think we can work- no digging fox holes, or transferring patients from gurneys, it does require compassion and ability to think on the job as the eyes tell a story about the whole body. Welcome, and I thank you, the army and personal family for keeping us safe!

Charisse – imatters.

Eyecessorize Highlights Children’s Eyewear Trends, Tips for Back-to-School on ‘The Daily Buzz’

 

On Thursday, Aug. 29, Eyecessorize – The Vision Council’s fashion eyewear campaign – secured a TV placement on “The Daily Buzz,” a nationally syndicated morning show that reaches more than 1.3 million viewers every day. Lifestyle reporter Katlean de Monchy shared her must-have back-to-school items for children, including Converse and Lucky Brand glasses for girls and boys, from Eyewear and Accessories Division member REM Eyewear. She not only touched on the popular fall fashion trends in children’s eyewear, but also emphasized the importance of children receiving eye exams from an eye care provider at least once a year. To close, she directed viewers to thevisioncouncil.org for more children-related eyewear tips and guidelines.

 

 

misconceptions about probationary periods

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Employers sometimes use “probationary periods” when hiring new employees or promoting employees into a new position. Employers use the probationary period as a time to assess whether the new hire or newly promoted employee is a good fit for the position. Typically, probationary periods range from 3 months to 6 months.

The following are frequently asked questions, along with some common misconceptions, about probationary periods.

Q: Are probationary periods a good idea?

A: Probationary periods can lead to confusion regarding whether the employment relationship is “at-will”. “At-will” means that either the employee or the employer may terminate the employment relationship at any time, for any lawful reason. When employers use probationary periods, employees sometimes think that once they successfully complete a probationary period, they are no longer at risk for termination based upon their performance. This misunderstanding can lead to increased risk of wrongful termination lawsuits if the employer terminates the employee. Accordingly, with the exception of collective bargaining agreements or circumstances where the employer wishes to enter into a contract with a particular employee, probationary periods are generally not considered a best practice.

Additionally, the term “probationary period” may have a negative connotation for new employees. New hires may misinterpret “probationary” to mean that they are immediately placed on a disciplinary action plan at the start of their employment. This could negatively impact the employee’s perception of the company.

Q: How can I help employees understand my company’s probationary period policy?

A: If your company requires that new employees enter into a probationary period, make sure that your probationary period policies and procedures are carefully worded and applied consistently to all new hires. Your policies should make clear that upon successful completion of the probationary period, the status of the new hire’s employment will remain “at-will.” The policy should also make clear that “at-will” status is in effect even during the probationary period. Employers should consider consulting with legal counsel to ensure that their probationary period policies are drafted and implemented properly.

Note: Employers should also have a clear employment at-will disclaimer in their employee handbook to make the employment relationship clear.

Q: Which states recognize at-will employment?

A: In the United States, employment relationships are presumed to be at-will in all states except Montana. In Montana, employers can generally only terminate employees for good cause once they have completed the employer’s probationary period. If an employer does not establish a specific probationary period in Montana, the default probationary period is six months from the date of hire.

Q: Why would employers use probationary periods?

A: Probationary periods originated in union environments. It was a way for employers subject to a collective bargaining agreement to have a short period of time to evaluate employees where they would not be governed by the same termination requirements as during the regular employment period. Some non-union employers have since adopted the practice believing it is a way to assess a new hire’s skills and qualifications without the burden of following certain requirements that come with the employment relationship. Some employers also misconstrue the probationary period to mean that they would be free from wrongful termination lawsuits should the relationship not work out. This, however, is not true. New hires generally have the same protections as other employees and can be terminated at any time during the employment relationship. Having a special probationary period does not change that.

Q: What about an introductory period, training period, or orientation period? Are these different?

A: Some employers use an “introductory period,” “training period,” or “orientation period.” However, they all generally refer to the same type of initial period. And, if not handled correctly, they all run the risk of confusing employees regarding their employment status. Employers should carefully assess the benefit of having introductory periods, and if they wish to continue using them, consider working with legal counsel to develop and implement such policies.

Q: Without probationary periods, how can my company help make sure new hires are (and will continue to be) a good fit?

A: Employers should develop an effective hiring process to help find the best candidates for the position and avoid bad hires. During the interview process, employers should ask job-related and behavioral-based questions, and, where appropriate, should conduct post-offer job-related background and reference checks to help determine whether candidates have the potential to succeed in the open position.

Once hired, all employers should provide new employees with a comprehensive orientation process to familiarize them with the company (and vice versa). Supervisors should work closely with new hires, giving them the information, tools, and support they need to succeed. Supervisors should also establish clear goals, provide feedback and coaching regularly, and evaluate performance proactively and consistently.

Q: Without a probationary period, can my company require new hires to wait before they enroll in our health plan or are eligible for paid time off?

A: The Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) prohibits group health plans from applying a waiting period that exceeds 90 days for individuals otherwise eligible to enroll. Under the ACA, health plans are permitted to use “orientation periods” without violating the 90-day waiting period rule if the following requirements are met:

  • The period is not more than one month.
  • The 90-day waiting period begins on the first day after the orientation period.

Generally, employers may also establish reasonable waiting periods for employees to become eligible for voluntary company provided benefits, such as paid time off. Note: Some states and local jurisdictions have established paid leave laws that will have their own eligibility requirements with which covered employers must comply.

Q: If employees are terminated during their introductory period, are they disqualified from unemployment benefits?

A: The fact that an individual was terminated during an introductory period would not disqualify the employee from unemployment benefits. The same rules regarding eligibility for unemployment still apply. However, length of employment may be a factor in determining how much the employer will be impacted by the employee’s unemployment claim.

signs that it’s time to move your career forward

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We all get content at times, especially at a job that pays decently well and comes with a good group of co-workers. Maybe your job isn’t what you really want to do for the rest of your life, but you start convincing yourself, “This is fine—it’s not my dream job, but it’ll do for now.”

And there’s nothing wrong with feeling content or comfortable at your job.

But keep in mind that being “content” can easily lead to complacency—and that’s the danger zone. Complacency tends to generate excuses (“I’ll put up with this just for a few more months,” or “I just don’t have time to do a job search right now”) and leads us to settle (“This job will do for now,” or “Maybe I don’t need to be a VP [or fill in your blank dream job here]”). Worst of all, complacency will eventually lead to fear. And fear holds us back.

I have seen too many smart and talented friends and colleagues who have stayed in just-OK jobs. When they do decide to move on, they’ve been out of the job market for so long that they can’t even take that first step to update their resume—let alone apply for jobs. They’re gripped by fear of re-entering a different job market than the one they last recall. They have almost forgotten what it’s like to go on interviews. They feel inadequate compared to their peers and think the train has already passed them by. These feelings of fear can quickly get overwhelming, and the easy way out is often to postpone the job search, to ignore the matter at hand—and to spend more time in a less-than-dream-job.

So, if there’s one piece of advice I could give to anyone who wants to advance professionally, it’s this: Do not get complacent. In fact, make time to regularly check in with yourself about your career happiness and goals and consider whether it might be time to make that next move.

1) You can’t sleep at night due to the stress and thought of having to go into work the next day. The stress and lack of sleep really began to negatively affect my health.

2) You are not getting any feedback. If your direct manager doesn’t provide feedback on your performance—or the feedback is generic and thus difficult to take action on—it’s pretty tough to learn what it takes to move up within your organization or grow as a professional. The best managers are engaged with your career development and regularly offer advice and guidance—and if yours doesn’t, you owe it to yourself to look elsewhere.

3) The stress from the job makes you irritable and cranky around your family and friends. I was no fun to be around during this time. This job was so stressful that it started to negatively affect the relationships with my loved ones.

4) The job has zapped all the life out of you. You are tired all the time and lack the motivation you once had. This can happen when your company has no policy or no intention of ever implementing a work/life balance program for employees.

5) You are not learning. If your learning curve has flattened out or you’re really not feeling challenged, this may signal a need to move on. You may not be learning something new every day on the job, but you should be improving upon your core skills and picking up new ones. You often have to take this into your own hands, of course—asking to be involved in a new project, signing up for courses you’re interested in, or attending a relevant conference or seminar in your discipline, for example. But if these possibilities don’t exist at your current job, it’s a sign that the company is not serious about investing in your career development.

6) You don’t agree with the corporate culture or the direction the company is headed. In my case, the culture was a turn and burn environment. They had a high pressure environment, and we lived in constant fear of losing our jobs. There was no value placed in sales professionals, and the place was a revolving door.

7) Your ideas are not being heard, and your work is not valued. Many companies do a very poor job of recognizing their employees for their hard work and accomplishments. They don’t have any concept of the value in saying thank you.

8) You’re living the status quo. If you’ve been at the same company and position without any advancement or promotion for the past three years—and you want to continue moving your career forward—it’s time to look elsewhere. Even in a large organization where promotions are tough to come by, you should be able to make some sort of upward movement within this time frame.

9) You are the victim of verbal abuse, sexual harassment, or other types of illegal behavior. At the job I quit, I was bullied and verbally abused by my old boss. HR was no help and upper management turned a blind eye to it. DO NOT put up with this!

Given that many of us spend over 40 hours per week at our jobs, you owe it to yourself to regularly evaluate your career situation. Even if you’re perfectly happy at your current job, make it a habit to check in with yourself (or with a trusted buddy, if that’s helpful) at least twice a year. Not only is it a good opportunity to review your accomplishments (and get in the habit of regularly updating your resume!), but you’ll also force yourself to gauge the market conditions within your industry.

Best of all, going through this process will mean you’ll either find more satisfaction out of your current job—or you’ll discover new opportunities and move on to the next big thing.

 

-John White, Camilla Cho

new job? avoid these 5 common mistakes!

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Even if you graduated with honors and were a superstar during your summer internship, starting your first job can bring on a whole new set of challenges. You have a big learning curve ahead of you, you need to feel your way around the office culture, and you want to impress a group of people with whom who you’ll probably be working for a very long time.

So, how do you get off on the right foot? You’ve probably already heard some common advice about dressing appropriately, being on time, and investing in a retirement plan. However, when I talked to some of my fellow seasoned managers, they also brought up some less-obvious advice, based on mistakes they often see new professionals making. So before you suit up on that first day, read on for some important advice on what not to do.

Mistake #1: Getting Involved in Office Politics

When you’re new to an office, it can be easy to trust your co-workers when they start complaining, talking about others, or throwing out office conspiracy theories about what upper management is plotting next. They know the ropes, so they must be right—right?

Not exactly. Some of these veterans may have grown a cynical streak over the years, so it’s better to keep an open mind about your new co-workers and company than to be swayed by others’ opinions and experiences. Plus, gossiping by the water cooler when you should be working will hardly make a good impression on your boss. When the office politicking or complaining starts, it’s okay to smile, nod—and not get involved.

Mistake #2: Trying to be a Maverick on the First Day

Are you excited to dive in and make a difference as soon as possible? Hold on just a sec. The truth is, you’ll impress your supervisor more by learning the ins and outs of your job duties and department first. No one ever appreciates the overeager new employee who thinks she can solve all the department’s problems before even really understanding how things work.

Once you’ve got a good grasp on your job, feel free to ask for some of the more exciting opportunities you see or make suggestions for process improvements. You’ll have plenty of time to start making more meaningful contributions—just make sure that you’re doing a stellar job at your job, first.

 

Mistake #3: Not Asking for Help

No one will expect you to know everything. In fact, if you’re unclear on something, your co-workers probably prefer that you ask questions now instead of guessing and making a mistake you’ll have to fix later. It’s perfectly okay to admit when you need help or clarification, and there are plenty of people around you who were once in your shoes and would be happy to share their expertise. So ask them!

Also don’t be afraid to reach out to a variety of people besides your boss—you might find a great mentor or friend in the process.

Mistake #4: Not Communicating Enough

After you’ve learned the ropes a bit and are off and running, remember that you still need to keep your boss actively in the loop about what you’re working on and the progress you’re making. Get an idea of how often your boss likes to be updated, both in general and when you’re working on a particular project. Does she want to debrief at weekly meetings, or would she prefer periodic emails detailing the latest updates?

In addition to these regular updates, be sure to communicate anything important that comes up—including the bad news. The last thing you want is for your boss to be in a meeting and hear about something for the first time, leaving her unprepared. As my own boss likes to say, “I don’t like surprises.”

Mistake #5: Not Appreciating the Opportunity

Chances are, your first professional job is not going to be exactly what you had in mind. My first job in export customer service was certainly far from glamorous: I had to deal with irate customers, perform routine data entry, deliver bad news, and learn about papermaking (yawn!).

But you know what? It was a good opportunity. After all, customer relationship skills are always highly desirable, and learning the paper business showed I could pick up new things quickly. In addition, I learned how the corporate world worked, and I gained some valuable contacts and mentors.

Even if your first job isn’t necessarily your dream job, don’t dismiss it as a waste of time. Think instead about the new experiences you’re gaining—running meetings, putting together presentations, dealing with clients, or even just spending time at a company that will look great on your resume. Even a small change in perspective make “paying your dues” at a so-so job seem much more worthwhile.

5 steps for making your next career move

Better Job, Just Ahead Green Road Sign with Copy Room Over The Dramatic Clouds and Sky.

Your career is one half of your work/ life balance. For some it is even more than half. Finding that perfect career that will facilitate growth, offer new opportunities, and keep you comfortable is incredibly important. Once you find that career opportunity, you are not finished; you still need to land it.

imatters helps eye care professionals just like yourself discuss and make that transition to a new career or practice. We have put together a list of 5 steps to help make your career move that much more successful.

Step #1 – Be ruthlessly honest with yourself.

Facing your fears is no cake walk. Be prepared to dig deep to get to your inner “truths” so you can begin to understand what deep-seated anxiety and fears influence your decision making. Are you afraid of being out of a job? Disappointing your family? Not making much money or a meaningful contribution to the world? Whatever your fears, the process of pivoting your life starts with coming to terms with what is holding you back.

Step #2 – Write it out.

For many years I was an avid journal writer. Writing, I found, helps bring clarity and vision to what otherwise feels like a morass of thoughts and feelings. Write it all out. Make a list of your fears, directions to go in, the pros and cons of changing or staying put. Some of the best career counseling I ever got was between me and my journal. Just stay honest with yourself. And keep it real.

Step #3 – Talk it out.

Whether it’s friends, co-workers, a mentor, family, or psychologist, asking others for help is key. Just always keep in mind who you are talking to as people have their own bias. Most people, I’ve learned, are risk averse and afraid to change. And their feedback will be more about “being realistic” rather than helping you figure out how to turn your dream into a reality. Seek out people who conquered their fears and are living the life you want to live.

Step #4 – Listen to your gut.

The “gut”, I’ve learned, deserves respect. It isn’t always right but it’s right more often than not. Don’t be afraid to hear what it has to say. Learn to listen to it and trust it. Let your gut act as a light for you to follow, guiding you through tough decisions.

Step #5 – Embrace change. Don’t fear it.

Fear is a incredibly strong emotion. From my experience, fear of change is the #1 reason why people stay where they are and never come close to living a truly fulfilling life. Yet life itself is forever evolving and changing, ourselves included. Once you uncover the fears that keep you up at night, take ownership of them. Attack them. Embrace them. Own them so that they no longer hold power over you. Only then will you free yourself up to make decisions based not on your fears but on yours passions.

5 phrases to never put on your resume

resume pictureYour resume is the first one of the more important assets when trying to impress that hiring manager. Realistically, it is the first thing the interviewer will see, and only the best resumes make it through to the interview stage. Every word counts, and presentation is everything.

When you’re writing your resume, it’s best to avoid the cliche words that hiring managers and recruiters see over and over again. Even if you feel the terms are accurate, there is usually a livelier, more original way to describe yourself.

Here are five words and phrases you should avoid putting on your resume.

 

Hard Worker

Describing vaguely positive traits in a resume doesn’t prove your worth and may even undermine your value as a candidate in failing to show how you’re different. Focus on concrete skills and accomplishments instead of relying on personal description through adjectives, says David Allocco, a business development and operations executive at PierceGray, Inc.

“I would avoid the term ‘hard worker’ as it’s general and something anyone could apply to themselves,” Allocco says. “Instead, highlight actual accomplishments and results you can show off to potential employers. They like seeing data-driven numbers as opposed to general blanket statements.”

 

Out-of-the-Box

Idioms may add color to an informal conversation, but they don’t distinguish you professionally when used on your resume.

“Avoid overused and tired business idioms: out-of-the-box, win-win, core competencies, empowered, best practices There are many more; these are perfectly acceptable words, but they’ve been so overused that people are sick of them,” says Karen Southall Watts, author of “Go Coach Yourself.” “Rephrase and think clarity and not jargon. Avoid describing duties and instead focus on results. ‘Supervised a team of 12’ is much less compelling than ‘Led sales team to 5% increase in total closed deals.’”

 

Salary

Avoid mentioning money before you even get to the interview. “Any mention of the word ‘salary’ on a résumé sets off red alarms to an employer and would discourage them from bringing you in for an interview,” warns George Bernocco, a resume writer.

 

Reference Available Upon Request

This line isn’t necessary.

“Do not put ‘Reference available upon request’, or the names and contact points of the references themselves,” advises Elliot Lasson, executive director of Joblink of Maryland, Inc. “The former is understood, superfluous, and therefore just takes up valuable space. As for the latter, given that companies will often ask for a waiver before contacting references, they should probably be kept in a separate document.”

 

Objective

Your resume isn’t simply a summary of yourself. You are talking about yourself, technically, but through the lens of the company’s needs and expectations.

“We already know your objective,” says Lisa Rokusek, a managing partner at AgentHR Recruiting Group. “Instead of telling us about what you want, use this space to tell us about you and your experience. Make sure it is relevant to the role you are interested in. Make a thought argument for getting a conversation.”

 

sample job posting: optician + luxury boutique optical location = your career in NYC

Opticians licensed and ready to be licensed; your career in boutique retail has arrived!http://www.mediafire.com/convkey/7da5/xeh4g3rtltl6hkqfg.jpg?size_id=3
imatters is exclusively representing our newest client with several locations in NYC – including soho, east village, and other manhattan/nyc locations. With a growing business, we have several opportunities, including managers, assistant managers and optician opportunities.
Join us with a history in luxury goods, handling high end eyewear, and blending fashion with the medical function of your talent. We see that success as premium eyewear is delivered, and showcased on celebrities and their friends. Start building your reputation as a boutique optician and see your future soar with flexible hours, with an above average salary, excellent work environment and great benefits. we invite all candidates whom possess a history of extensive luxury eyewear sales experience, great customer service and interpersonal skills , licensed or ready to be licensed as an NY optician.
Lets get started today, by sending your resume to our dedicated spokesperson Charisse, email charisse@imatters.net, fax 866.461.4097, talk confidentially about your career at 866.412.4115 x 700.